fbpx

Your backstage pass to the world’s most prolific authors

What does it take to succeed as a writer? Hosts J.D. Barker, J. Thorn, and Zach Bohannon pull back the curtain and gain rare insight from the household names found on bookshelves worldwide.

Want to ask your favorite author a question? Click here!

How to Pivot Your Story with Eliza Jane Brazier

Eliza Jane Brazier knows the benefit of pivoting your story at the right time. When her latest book, Good Rich People, wasn’t living up to her expectations, she put in the effort to rewrite her entire manuscript twice in order to achieve a rounder, more complex story that she could be proud of. Eliza is well known for her thriller, If I Disappear, and works as a screenwriter and journalist when she isn’t writing. To purchase Good Rich People, follow the link below.

From Amazon.com:

Eliza Jane Brazier is an author, screenwriter, and journalist. She currently lives in Los Angeles, where she is developing If I Disappear for television.

J.K. Rowling was nearly homeless when she wrote the first Harry Potter book. Stephen King penned CARRIE on a small desk wedged between a washer and dryer. James Patterson worked in advertising and famously wrote the Toys “R” Us theme song long before becoming an author.

Whether you’re traditionally published or indie, writing a good book is only the first step in becoming a successful author. The days of just turning a manuscript into your editor and walking away are gone. If you want to succeed in today’s publishing world, you need to understand every aspect of the business – editing, formatting, marketing, contracts. It all starts with a good book, then the real work begins.

Join international bestselling author J.D. Barker and indie powerhouses, J. Thorn and Zach Bohannon, as they gain unique insight and valuable advice from the most prolific and accomplished authors in the business.

In this episode, you’ll discover:

  • Why Eliza loves “Fleabag”
  • How she found her voice
  • How to balance writing for yourself and your audience
  • How to write yourself into your characters
  • Why to be careful of “clean” first drafts

J. D. Barker – http://jdbarker.com/

J. Thorn – https://theauthorlife.com/

Zach Bohannon – https://zachbohannon.com/

Best of BookTook – https://bestofbooktok.com/ 

The Carbon Almanac – https://books2read.com/carbonalmanac 

Eliza Jane Brazier – https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/authors/2210719/eliza-jane-brazier/

Good Rich Peoplehttps://mybook.to/GoodRichPeople

Story Rubric – http://storyrubric.com  

Nonfic Rubric – http://nonficrubric.com  

Scene Rubric – http://scenerubric.com 

Proudly sponsored by Kobo Writing Life – https://kobowritinglife.com/

Music by Nicorus – https://cctrax.com/nicorus/dust-to-dust-ep 

Voice Over by Rick Ganley – http://www.nhpr.com and recorded at Mill Pond Studio – http://www.millpondstudio.com

Contact – https://writersinkpodcast.com/dev/contact/ 

*Full disclosure: Some of the links are affiliate links.

2 Comments

  1. Christopher Wills

    7 months ago  

    Morning guys, great show today.
    Fascinated to hear that Eliza rewrites books from scratch and your discussion about it after. It suggests that ‘good enough’ is usually not good enough.
    I also agree with Eliza and Zach that wordcounts are not that important, progress is far more important, we are not making widgets.
    And I’ve never had a problem with the idea of rewriting a book, although I know some writers might throw their hands up in horror at that. One improves as a writer over time and if one had a great story early on, why not rewrite it? I think the main advantage is longevity. If one can invoke the magical power of word-of-mouth because it is a great story and it is well written, the dividends are going to be there.
    Loved the interview today.

    1. J. Thorn

      7 months ago  

      I’m like you. I love rewriting, almost to a fault.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.