Writers, Ink Podcast: Episode 92 – Navigating Difficult Topics in Writing with NYT Bestseller Karin Slaughter

Navigating Difficult Topics in Writing

Navigating Difficult Topics in Writing with NYT Bestseller Karin Slaughter

A tale of two sisters rediscovering a troubled past– in her latest novel, False Witness, international bestseller Karin Slaughter uses the real complexities of childhood trauma to develop rounder, more interesting characters while paying special attention to the accurate representation of traumatized individuals so that the story feels realistic and relatable. A bestseller of over 35 million copies in 120 countries, Slaughter is one of the best writers in the thriller genre and is known for captivating tales like Pretty Girls and The Good Daughter. To order False Witness, follow the link below.

From Amazon.com:

Karin Slaughter is one of the world’s most popular and acclaimed storytellers. Published in 120 countries with more than 35 million copies sold across the globe, her 21 novels include the Grant County and Will Trent books, as well as the Edgar-nominated COP TOWN and the instant NYT bestselling stand-alone novels PRETTY GIRLS, THE GOOD DAUGHTER, and PIECES OF HER. Slaughter is the founder of the Save the Libraries project–a nonprofit organization established to support libraries and library programming. A native of Georgia, she lives in Atlanta. Her stand-alone novel PIECES OF HER is in development with Netflix, starring Toni Collette, and the Grant County and Will Trent series are in development for television.

Whether you’re traditionally published or indie, writing a good book is only the first step in becoming a successful author. The days of just turning a manuscript into your editor and walking away are gone. If you want to succeed in today’s publishing world, you need to understand every aspect of the business – editing, formatting, marketing, contracts. It all starts with a good book, then the real work begins.

Join international bestselling author J.D. Barker and indie powerhouses, J. Thorn and Zach Bohannon, as they gain unique insight and valuable advice from the most prolific and accomplished authors in the business.

In this episode, you’ll discover:

  • Karin’s Save the Libraries Project
  • How to humanize “troubled” characters
  • When to write authentically but mindfully
  • How to fit writing into a work schedule
  • The role of hardship in art

Links:

J. D. Barker – http://jdbarker.com/

J. Thorn – https://theauthorlife.com/

Zach Bohannon – https://zachbohannon.com/

J.’s Vella project – https://www.amazon.com/kindle-vella/product/B0994PXSP1 

Karin Slaughter – https://www.karinslaughter.com/

Save the Libraries – http://www.savethelibraries.com/

False Witness https://mybook.to/FalseWitness

Story Rubric – http://storyrubric.com  

Nonfic Rubric – http://nonficrubric.com  

The Career Author Summit 2021 – https://thecareerauthor.com/summit2021/ 

Proudly sponsored by Kobo Writing Life – https://kobowritinglife.com/

Music by Nicorus – https://cctrax.com/nicorus/dust-to-dust-ep 

Voice Over by Rick Ganley – http://www.nhpr.com and recorded at Mill Pond Studio – http://www.millpondstudio.com

Contact – https://writersinkpodcast.com/contact/ 

*Full disclosure: Some of the links are affiliate links.

3 thoughts on “Writers, Ink Podcast: Episode 92 – Navigating Difficult Topics in Writing with NYT Bestseller Karin Slaughter”

  1. Fascinating interview today guys. Karin is a great writer and I love her enthusiasm. Totally agree with her idea that if people don’t like what she writes go and read something else.
    Interesting conversation about sensitivity readers. I will never use them. I do my research and I write my stories. I don’t intend to be insensitive or offensive; I’m not politicking, I’m writing fiction. As Karin suggests if people don’t like it go find something else to read.
    I think ‘woke’ is one of the worst things to happen to culture and the sooner it dies the better. I hope that statement doesn’t offend anyone 🙂 …

    btw you don’t yet have a link to ‘Save the Libraries’

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